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Gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook, Han dynasty

Gold and Silver Inlaid Bronze Belt Hook, Han Dynasty

U329 Gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook
U329 Gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook
U329 Gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook
U329 Gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook
Ref: U329

Chinese gold and silver inlaid bronze belt hook, Han dynasty (206 B.C. - 220 A.D.), the slender rounded shaft decorated with gold and silver sheet wire inlay forming geometric motifs between horizontal lines, below a tapering dragon's head hook, the reverse with a flat knop for attachment,


Dimensions:

Length: 4in., 10.2cm


Condition:

Chip to knop.


Notes:

The belt hook is a device for fastening that predates the belt buckle.[1][2] A possible bone belt hook found in the Bronze Age layers of Yanik Tepe, northeast of Lake Urmia, Iran The earliest archaeological evidence of belt hooks date to the 7th century BCE, in East Asia.[1] Belt hooks were made with bronze, iron, gold, and jade.[1] Texts from Warring States period China claim that the belt hook originates from Central Asian nomads, although belt hooks have been found in China predating the Warring States.[2] The equestrian tradition, initially foreign to China, was tightly related to wearing belted pants, thus belt hooks became one of the features of "barbaric" exoticism. As such, the hooks became an object of aesthetic contemplation. For example, Qu Yuan (ca.340-278 BCE) compares beautiful women to the belt hooks xianbei 鮮卑.[3] Belt hooks have also been found in Celtic archaeological sites.[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belt_hook